CHRISTMAS OFFER Subscribe to Pilot Magazine today CLICK HERE

What next?

PUBLISHED: 11:45 06 December 2005 | UPDATED: 13:45 10 October 2012

Used aeroplane prices start at £6,000 for a single-seater, rising to £12,000 for a basic two-seater, and £30,000 for a four-seat aircraft. New aeroplanes start at around £40,000. Microlights are roughly three-quarters these prices, helicopters, roughly double.

What next?



Used aeroplane prices start at £6,000 for a single-seater, rising to £12,000 for a basic two-seater, and £30,000 for a four-seat aircraft. New aeroplanes start at around £40,000. Microlights are roughly three-quarters these prices, helicopters, roughly double.



           
Many people fly a four-seat aircraft which operates rather like a family car, and use it for short flights in the local area at the weekend and for longer touring holidays. The main running costs are hangarage, maintenance, fuel and insurance, which adds up to around £6,000 a year. However, it is common for three or four families to co-own the aeroplane, so a budget of £2,000 per family is well within reach. Pilots who fly under twenty hours a year often hire club aeroplanes — prices start at around £75 an hour.



           
At the cheaper end it is possible (like Pilot’s Editor) to operate a simple single-seat aircraft for £1,000 a year.

Build a kitplane



There is a wide range of kit aeroplanes on the market, and building your own aircraft is becoming increasingly popular. Construction and materials are carefully supervised, and the kits are not cheap, but the satisfaction of flying in an aeroplane you built yourself is unbeatable. The rules allow you to do your own maintenance on homebuilt and factory-built aircraft, but it must be supervised and signed for by a licensed engineer, and you must use approved parts.



 



Start your own airfield



Under UK planning regulations, any piece of land can be used as an airfield with the owner’s OK, without planning permission from the local authority, for up to 28 days a year (the same rule applies to car boot sales). There are well over a thousand small private airstrips in the country taking advantage of this generous rule. You only need a strip of flat turf 300 by 50 yards to operate a simple light aeroplane. Helicopters can be operated from a large back garden… hundreds are.



 



Classic aircraft



Enthusiasts operate and maintain aeroplanes like the Tiger Moth biplane dating back as far as the nineteen-twenties and thirties. There are also hundreds of American fabric-covered light aeroplanes like the Piper Cub flying in the UK dating from the fourties and fifties. Restoring and operating classic aircraft is every bit as popular as restoring and maintaining classic cars, and is often cheaper.



 



Aerobatics



For many people, having an aeroplane is ab

More from Techniques & Training

Wednesday, October 24, 2018

Extend your hours of operation with a journey into night − the rating can be gained in as little as five hours and, if you’re lucky with the weather, three evenings of dual and solo flying | Words: Tony Cutty

Read more
Friday, October 12, 2018

The saying goes: ‘if there’s any doubt, there’s no doubt’. But sometimes we learn this the hard way | Words: James Anderson

Read more
Thursday, September 27, 2018

We’d entered cloud inadvertently and were climbing to avoid high ground, so why did the aircraft suddenly sound and feel so very strange? | By Alistair Macpherson

Read more
Tuesday, September 18, 2018

How air-brained are you? Test your general aviation knowledge on matters including safety, history, training or anything related to flying! Compiled by James Allan

Read more
Friday, August 24, 2018

Only my second visit, a frisky Learjet, and snow ‘patches’ on the runway – what fun we could have! | By Linton Chilcott

Read more
Tuesday, August 14, 2018

How air-brained are you? Test your general aviation knowledge on matters including safety, history, training or anything related to flying! Compiled by James Allan

Read more
Friday, June 29, 2018

Showing off to his mates while not paying enough attention to the aeroplane was almost the last thing this pilot ever did | By Charlie Huke

Read more
Friday, June 15, 2018

Covering all the points when briefing non-flying onlookers is essential; how they receive that information is variable... By Tony Dring

Read more
Friday, June 15, 2018

How air-brained are you? Test your general aviation knowledge on matters including safety, history, training or anything related to flying! Compiled by James Allan

Read more
Friday, June 8, 2018

A pilot with limited Tiger Moth experience gets a rude awakening when he ignores that little creeping doubt at the back of his mind | Words: Peter Binks

Read more

Newsletter Sign Up

Pilot weekly newsletter
Sign up to receive our regular email newsletter

Our Privacy Policy


Subscribe or buy Pilot Magazine