GUIDE TO GETTING A COMMERCIAL PILOT LICENCE

A COMMERCIAL AIRLINE pilot and flying instructor, the author published the first version of this book in 1993, and since then has managed to keep it continually updated with changes in regulations and syllabus for CPL training.

A COMMERCIAL AIRLINE pilot and flying instructor, the author published the first version of this book in 1993, and since then has managed to keep it continually updated with changes in regulations and syllabus for CPL training so that this May 2000 version is the 27th edition. It is ring-bound to allow further changes in connection with CAA/JAA regulations and alterations in such things as NVQ and VTR schemes to be easily incorporated, keeping it up to date. Clive Hughes, perhaps optimistically, expresses an intention to publish a perfect-bound version once these things settle down a bit. Will they ever?

In its present form this Guide should be an invaluable purchase for any young man or woman intent on becoming a commercial pilot. The author doesn't simply give a description of the routes towards and the requirements for a CPL (and eventually ATPL) as they currently stand. He also outlines many of the advantages and disadvantages of such things as training abroad for the PPL and/or CPL, hours-building abroad or in the UK, perhaps in an aircraft of one's own or as part of a group, and gives details of the European Modular route towards an ATPL. He also warns, again and again, of the pitfalls that are liable to await any pilot who is foolish enough to pay a lump sum in advance for his or her training. (Since the author worked for some years in sales and marketing for two flying schools, he must know what he is warning about here!)

The book is not faultless. For example; Hughes's definition of VFR implies (erroneously, since Class D and E are still controlled airspace) that VFR is not permitted within controlled airspace. He also seems to have forgotten that Greece is a member of the EC, and all UK airspace is controlled above FL245, and not above 24,500 feet as stated here. These, however, are but little nits to pick. The basic content of the book is well thought out, well laid out and much easier to understand and follow than the official, published JAA jargon on the same subjects. Clive Hughes's Guide could save potential CPL candidates several thousands of pounds in the course of their training.

Since James Allan wrote this review, Clive Hughes has enlarged his guide to list airlines employing UK pilots, taxi operators and some corporate aircraft users.There is now a website:

www.ppl-atpl.demon.co.uk

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