OPERATIONAL FLYING

THE AUTHOR OF this manual has over 6,000 hours in his logbook, a UK ATPL for aeroplanes and helicopters, and an intriguingly cynical attitude towards the official documentation which he tries, in this chunky book, to turn into something the average pilot has a chance of understanding.

THE AUTHOR OF this manual has over 6,000 hours in his logbook, a UK ATPL for aeroplanes and helicopters, and an intriguingly cynical attitude towards the official documentation which he tries, in this chunky book, to turn into something the average pilot has a chance of understanding. He makes a pretty good job of this task too.

Aimed mainly at pilots who work for small charter companies, in corporate aviation or are commercially self employed, the book could also be usefully read by pilots and operations staff working in bigger companies, such as airlines. This is really an extended and updated version of the Airlife published book The Professional Pilot's Manual that was published over fifteen years ago. It now incorporates details of JAR, a useful thirty page index to the ANO, Rules of the Air and Air Navigation General Regulations. There is also a short Glossary and an indispensable index to the work itself.

As well as covering virtually every aspect of commercial operations and procedures, Operational Flying deals with how to go about setting up an aviation company and get an AOC, and covers advice on getting a piloting job, framing your CV and handling your interview. The chapter on 'Techie Stuff' (yes, that's what he calls it!) has a few funnies, and lot of material on helicopters, with which the author is very familiar. The one on 'Legal Stuff' contains at least one section of interest to private pilots, the definition of what is and what isn't commercial air transport. This section opens with the appropriate warning: 'This subject is complicated and causes acute brainfade!' The whole book has however been expertly compiled with the aim of helping the reader avoid brainfade. Anyone hoping one day to be a Chief Pilot, and everyone who is involved in the running of an aviation company, large or small, should be able to find something valuable and helpful within these pages.

Most pilots could benefit from taking to heart an astute quotation contained in the introduction. 'Never allow your ego, self confidence, love of flying, pressure from a customer, boss or co pilot, or economic need to interfere with your good judgement during any stage of a flight. There is no amount of pride, no thrill, pleasure, schedule or job that is worth your licence or your life and the lives of your passengers.' And, believe me, there is a great deal more of value than just that maxim that readers will get out of this witty yet professional publication. James Allan.