Nose job

Surface wind at RAF Benson was reported as 010�/14kt when the EAA Biplane’s pilot was carrying out a pre-takeoff power check at the holding point for Rwy 01 with the aircraft on a westerly heading.

During a carburettor heat check he became aware through peripheral vision that the aircraft’s attitude was changing and looked up to see that the tail was starting to rise, despite application of full aft stick. He closed the throttle, released the brakes and switched the engine off, but was unable to stop the aircraft tipping forwards, coming to rest on its nose. The pilot thought that a wind shift, combined with a forward centre of gravity (but which was within prescribed limits) might have contributed to the accident.