Subscribe and receive a FREE Pooleys 2019 Flight Guide CLICK HERE

CAA announces change to night flying regulations

PUBLISHED: 16:56 10 May 2012 | UPDATED: 14:14 10 October 2012

CAA announces change to night flying regulations

CAA announces change to night flying regulations

A change to night flying regulations will enable pilots to operate under Visual Flight Rules (VFR) during hours of darkness.

A change to night flying regulations will enable pilots to operate under Visual Flight Rules (VFR) during hours of darkness.

Currently, civil aircraft flying in the UK must comply with Instrument Flight Rules (IFR), but the CAA has announced that from 8 June 2012 this requirement will be removed. As a result, pilots will be able to choose whether to fly VFR or IFR.

Visual Flight Rules are an internationally agreed standard set of operating rules designed to help prevent collisions between aircraft and the ground. It ensures that pilots fly in weather conditions that allow them to see a potential collision and take action to avoid it.

Instrument Flight Rules are a more restrictive set of internationally agreed operating rules. They include additional measures to help prevent collisions between aircraft - particularly when flying in weather conditions where pilots may not be able to see other aircraft or obstacles and in areas with high volumes of traffic.

The changes have been made in order to take into account new and upcoming European Aviation Safety Agency Regulations that cover pilot licensing and rules of the air.

The CAA has said that the majority of requirements for VFR at night are similar to existing Instrument Flight Rules. This means that UK pilots will be able to continue flying at night, as long as they hold a valid Night Rating or Qualification.

Those who hold an Instrument Rating or IMC Rating will continue to have to choice of flying IFR at night.

Additionally, the CAA has published a Safety Notice (2012/007) that contains the full details and can be viewed here. Page eight features a comparison chart that highlights the differences between the new VFR and existing IFR requirements.

The organisation welcomes feedback from stakeholders, so please click here to contact it.

Most Read

Most Read

Latest from the Pilot