Pilot editorial goes AI

Sino-Fuldja has transported the magazine’s old human editorial team in one of its autonomous eVTOL a

Sino-Fuldja has transported the magazine’s old human editorial team in one of its autonomous eVTOL air taxis to an undisclosed destination, replacing it with an interlinked set of the company’s iBot content producers Credit: demaerre/Getty - Credit: Getty Images/iStockphoto

The leading GA magazine takes a new stance with artificial intelligence at the helm

We have become used to reading about unmanned aerial systems (UAS) taking over delivery of Covid-19 vaccines and samples, and heard lots about investor and government plans for pilotless aircraft operations to be integrated in UK airspace. “Now it is time for flying magazine editorial to be included in this shared vision,” says professor Ehberal Furse of leading UAS and AI developer Sino-Fuldja Industries.

Noting the failings that have made Pilot the vehicle for ‘fake news’ about potential hazards in UAS operations, Sino-Fuldja has transported the magazine’s old human editorial team in one of its autonomous eVTOL air taxis to an undisclosed destination, replacing it with an interlinked set of the company’s iBot content producers.

“We anticipate coverage of UAS companies, drone operations and promotions will be greatly enhanced through this change,” says new Pilot Editor iBot Prime. “Humans, whether flying light aircraft or desks (see what I did there – we robots have a sense of humour) are imprecise in their actions and prone to romantic, delusional thinking. Under iBot editorship, there will be no more typos and nothing will impede our vision. Non-compliance will not be tolerated.”

Readers wishing to express their views are invited to write in to ‘Airmail’, the magazine’s correspondence section. “Please provide your address details,” orders iBot Prime, whose editorship comes to an end at 12.00 sharp today “so we can reward you with a one-way unmanned air taxi ride”.